Slavery in Sudan

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CSI has been working on the ground in Sudan since 1995 to liberate Christians and other non-Muslims forced into slavery by Islamist militiamen armed and directed by the Khartoum regime. Working through a local underground network, we have rescued tens of thousands of people from slavery.  Still, thousands remain in bondage – over 35,000 according to a Sudanese government official.


Slavery in Sudan was revived in 1983, when the Arab Muslim government of Sudan began using slave raids as a weapon in its war to put down Southern rebellion against the government’s imposition of Islamic law.  The government armed Arab Muslim militia groups, and encouraged them to raid Southern villages, steal their property, and take their women and children as slaves.  Tens of thousands of people were captured and enslaved.

In 1995, CSI teams discovered a local network of Africans and Arabs working together to help retrieve some of those abducted into slavery. With CSI’s assistance, this indigenous Underground Railroad grew into a sophisticated network that has managed to liberate tens of thousands of people.

Meet one of our slave retrievers.

A peace treaty in 2005 put an end to the slave raids, and paved the way for the south to become an independent country in 2011.  However, the treaty provided no way home for those already enslaved.  Today, CSI continues working to bring these people home.

Our liberation mission depends on supporters like you. You can help rescue a person from slavery today! Click HERE to donate.

Slave Stories

Arek Luer Akol: “Please Find My Children.”

Arek Luer Akol was freed from slavery in Sudan through CSI’s underground railroad. When we met her in January 2013, she told us that her four children – Adam, Awou, Amuna and Asha – had been separated from her, and were still enslaved. In this video, Arek implores CSI supporters to help free her children.

Read More Stories of Slavery Survivors

Learn More About CSI’s Slave Liberation Network

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